News

Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center Receives NSF Award for Bridges Supercomputer

$9.65-Million Supercomputer Will Enable Analysis of Vast Data Sets, Ease Entry for New Research Communities into High-Performance Computing

The Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC) has received a National Science Foundation (NSF) award to create a uniquely capable supercomputer designed to empower new research communities, bring desktop convenience to supercomputing, expand campus access and help researchers needing to tackle vast data to work more intuitively. Called Bridges, the new supercomputer will consist of three tiered, memory-intensive resources to serve a wide variety of scientists, including those new to supercomputing and without specialized programming skills. Bridges will offer new computational capabilities to researchers working in diverse, dataintensive fields such as genomics, the social sciences and the humanities.

Bridges represents a new approach to supercomputing, emphasizing research problems that are limited by data movement and analysis, in addition to computational performance as measured by floating-point operations per second (“flops”), and thereby serves new communities of scientists.

“First and foremost, Bridges is about enabling researchers who’ve outgrown their own computers and campus computing clusters to graduate to supercomputing with a minimum of additional effort,” says Ralph Roskies, PSC scientific director and professor of physics, University of Pittsburgh. “We expect it to empower researchers to focus on their science more than the computing.”

A $9.65-million NSF grant will fund the acquisition, to begin in October 2015, with a target production date of January 2016. The system will be architected and delivered by HP® and will feature advanced technology from Intel® and NVIDIA®.

For more information, click here.

PhD Defense-Joseph Meyers

Research Advisor: Dr. Eric Swanson
"The Schwinger-Dyson Equations and Gluon Bound States of QCD"
Wednesday, December 3, 2014
Allen Hall, Room 321 1:00 pm

PhD Defense--Seth DeVore

Research Advisor: Dr. Chandralekha Singh

"Using Tutorial Approach to Improve Physics Learning from Introductory to Graduate Level""

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

Allen Hall, Room 319 2:30 pm

Hrvoje Petek's Team First to Detect Exciton in Metal

Hrvoje Petek's team of experimental and theoretical physicists and chemists from the University of Pittsburgh and Institute of Zagreb, Croatia, have become the first to detect a fundamental particle of light-matter interaction in metals, the exciton. The teams work is published online in Nature Physics.

Industrial Physics Forum

Pitt graduate student Chitra Gautham, who is working toward her PhD under the guidance of Professor David Snoke, was accepted to the Industrial Physics Forum in Brazil. Also in attendance is Pitt BS alumna Anna Quider, who received her PhD at Cambridge University, England.Shown is a photo taken at the event.

Carles Badenes on New Supernova Remnant Analysis

A recent article by NASA highlights the new method an international team of astronomers has used in handling information gathered from the Suzaku X-ray observatory. Team member Carles Badenes was consulted by NASA on the new efforts and explained the difficulties typically associated with identifying supernova remnants.

Hrvoje Petek's Team First to Detect Exciton in Metal

Hrvoje Petek's team of experimental and theoretical physicists and chemists from the University of Pittsburgh and Institute of Zagreb, Croatia, have become the first to detect a fundamental particle of light-matter interaction in metals, the exciton. The teams work is published online in Nature Physics.

Sergey Frolov Earns $3 Million Grant to Study Fundamental Particle

Sergey Frolov has received a $3 million Office of Naval Research Basic Research Challenge grant to explore ways of transforming quantum computing through the use of an unusual particle. Sergey will be the primary investigator for the study on the Majorana fermion, a long-posted but elusive elementary particle that Sergey and colleagues discovered in 2012.

 

PhD Defense-Stefanus

Research Advisor: Dr. Tao Han

"Determination of Dark Matter Mass at Lepton Colliders and Experimental Studies in 2D Turbulence"

Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Allen Hall, Room 319 2:00 pm

 

Congratulations, Class of 2014!

Class of 2014

Our department's Class of 2014 Physics and Astronomy Majors included 20 well-rounded individuals who plan to utilize their Bachelor of Science degree in graduate-level research, software engineering, law, medical physics, and atmospheric studies. Most of our 8 PhD graduates this calendar year have already accepted Post-Doctoral positions around the world. We congratulate them on a job well-done and wish them the best in their future endeavors.

Follow some of their histories in the department through this 2014 Commencement Breakfast Reception Presentation.

PhD Defense-Anja Weyant

Research Advisor: Dr. Michael Wood-Vasey

"Employing Modern Statistics to Explore the Universe with Type la Supernovae"

Tuesday, April 22, 2014

Allen Hall, Rm 321 2:00 pm

Goldwater Scholarship and Honorable Mention Awarded to Physics Undergraduates

University of Pittsburgh physics and computer engineering major, Emily Crabb, has been named a 2014 Barry M. Goldwater Scholarship winner. Undergraduate physics major, Alexandre Gauthier, received Honorable Mention designation in the national 2014 Goldwater Scholarship competition. Congratulations to both students!

PhD Defense-Brandon Eberly

Research Advisor: Steven A. Dytman

"Characterization of Final State Interaction Strength in Plastic Scintillator by Muon-Neutrino Charged Current Charged Pion Production"

Monday, March 17, 2014 at 1:00 PM

Room 321 Allen Hall

 

Professor Sergey Frolov Named Sloan Fellow

Professor Sergey Frolov has been named a 2014 Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellow.

Hrvoje Petek Receives the Morino Award

Hrvoje Petek received the Morino Award for his achievements in spectroscopy from the Morino Foundation on February 10, 2014 at Kyoto University.

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